Currently Reading, Unhaul and Non-fiction haul

I am currently alternating between listening to the audiobook and reading The Orenda by Joseph Boyden. The story is set around the 1600s in what is now Canada and told in 3 different point of views. One french Jesuit priest, one Huron war chief, and one yound captured Iroquois girl. It’s a very good portrait of this period that I feel we don’t see enough in literature. I’m about halfway through and mostly enjoying the narration (a different person for each of the 3 characters), although when I can I prefer reading the book.

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Also, I’ve made myself unhaul a ton of books a few weeks ago. It made it easier for me to start considering getting rid of the books I’ve read that I didn’t really enjoy and would definitely never be rereading, or books I had more than one edition of. Here is the recent donated pile :

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Also, I’ve recently been on a NON-FICTION kick, especially historical. I don’t know why now, but I feel drawn and interested by them. I’ve always liked learning and I think it’s important to keep ourselves afloat general-knowledge wise. Here are some books that I’ve bought in the past few weeks with a brief description :

14001936_10153803288842551_1616618402_o  E. H. Gombrich’s bestselling history of the world tells the story of mankind from the Stone Age to the atomic bomb, focusing not on small detail but on the sweep of human experience, the extent of human achievement, and the depth of its frailty. The product of a generous and humane sensibility, this timeless account makes intelligible the full span of human history. In forty concise chapters, Gombrich tells the story of man from the stone age to the atomic bomb. In between emerges a colorful picture of wars and conquests, grand works of art, and the spread and limitations of science. This is a text dominated not by dates and facts, but by the sweep of mankind’s experience across the centuries, a guide to humanity’s achievements and an acute witness to its frailties.

 In Sapiens, Dr Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to13978078_10153803288762551_1584280319_o the radical – and sometimes devastating – breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power … and our future.

In the first full-length biography of Alexander Hamilton in decades, Ron Chernow tells the riveting story of a man who overcame all odds to shape, inspire, and scandalize the newborn America. Few figure14012920_10153803288802551_205105109_os in American history have been more hotly debated or more grossly misunderstood than Alexander Hamilton. Chernow’s biography gives Hamilton his due and sets the record straight, deftly illustrating that the political and economic greatness of today’s America is the result of Hamilton’s countless sacrifices to champion ideas that were often wildly disputed during his time.  (I know it’s been widely popular but I have never read anything about the play nor heard the soundtrack every body seems crazy about.)
14012488_10153803288682551_900215241_o Gripping and often poetic, Alone Against the North is a classic adventure story of single-minded obsession, physical hardship, and the restless sense of wonder that every explorer has in common.  But what does exploration mean in an age when satellite imagery of even the remotest corner of the planet is available to anyone with a phone? Is there anything left to explore? Cutting through this forbidding landscape is a river no explorer, trapper, or canoeist had left any record of paddling. It was this river that Shoalts was obsessively determined to explore.

What are you currently reading? Also if you have any non-fiction rec for me don’t hesitate to share!

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